lazy food.

(not into photography or measurements or baking, for the most part)
nothing really interesting about the typical breakfast in my house - just wanted to share my foolproof way of making a soft boiled egg.
boil water. add egg(s). 5 minutes, 30 seconds. rinse under cold water. peel, eat. 

nothing really interesting about the typical breakfast in my house - just wanted to share my foolproof way of making a soft boiled egg.

boil water. add egg(s). 5 minutes, 30 seconds. rinse under cold water. peel, eat. 

— 9 months ago
#eggs 
it’s hot in LA…which means it’s hot as fuck in my house. we don’t have a/c and the only fan is in our bedroom, which means it’s real tough to commit to actually COOKING once i get home from work. i’ll be freezing in the office all day, drooling over food blogs and restaurant menus, sending grocery lists to Dan — and the second I get home I’m like, well, f those grand plans.
so last night i made a vegetarian caeser salad because it required minimal effort and sounded refreshing…and it WAS refreshing.
i made the dressing of mayo, evoo, garlic, dijon, red wine vinegar, parmesan, and a bit of lemon. tossed into romaine hearts. topped with some croutons and pepper. 
we ate it while cry-laughing along with the Degrassi graduation special, TIME OF MY LIFE…. spoiler alert, Clare has leukemia? wtf Degrassi….

it’s hot in LA…which means it’s hot as fuck in my house. we don’t have a/c and the only fan is in our bedroom, which means it’s real tough to commit to actually COOKING once i get home from work. i’ll be freezing in the office all day, drooling over food blogs and restaurant menus, sending grocery lists to Dan — and the second I get home I’m like, well, f those grand plans.

so last night i made a vegetarian caeser salad because it required minimal effort and sounded refreshing…and it WAS refreshing.

i made the dressing of mayo, evoo, garlic, dijon, red wine vinegar, parmesan, and a bit of lemon. tossed into romaine hearts. topped with some croutons and pepper. 

we ate it while cry-laughing along with the Degrassi graduation special, TIME OF MY LIFE…. spoiler alert, Clare has leukemia? wtf Degrassi….

— 9 months ago
#caeser salad 
i debated even including this variation on a familiar theme. brown rice pasta, vegetables, blahblahblah… there is something very sexy and satisfying about tossing a pasta in a cast iron skillet. 
i need to google how to clean a cast iron skillet. i think i ruined mine. fuck.

i debated even including this variation on a familiar theme. brown rice pasta, vegetables, blahblahblah… there is something very sexy and satisfying about tossing a pasta in a cast iron skillet. 

i need to google how to clean a cast iron skillet. i think i ruined mine. fuck.

— 10 months ago
#cast iron  #gluten free 
ah oui, oui, on Sundays i go to pilates and then the farmer’s market and i buy my eggs and how do you say? haricot vert? ah string beans, oui oui and asparagus aussi. i make a vinaigrette and eat it with baguette. (this actually tasted like shit because i think my evoo had gone bad or something and/or i used an old lemon)

ah oui, oui, on Sundays i go to pilates and then the farmer’s market and i buy my eggs and how do you say? haricot vert? ah string beans, oui oui and asparagus aussi. i make a vinaigrette and eat it with baguette. (this actually tasted like shit because i think my evoo had gone bad or something and/or i used an old lemon)

— 10 months ago with 1 note
#egg  #haricots vert 
 how gorgeous is this? vegetable paella from the PLENTY cookbook. honestly, it looks better than it tastes. i realized i don’t really like saffron - it tastes fishy. adds a fleshy depth. Dan loved the meal…which pleased me of course. i enjoy the texture of arborino rice. very chewy. 

 how gorgeous is this? vegetable paella from the PLENTY cookbook. honestly, it looks better than it tastes. i realized i don’t really like saffron - it tastes fishy. adds a fleshy depth. Dan loved the meal…which pleased me of course. i enjoy the texture of arborino rice. very chewy. 

— 10 months ago
#vegetarian  #paella 
my neighbors made the most incredible sauteed swiss chard the other night. their secret was to let the chard cook for close to an hour, bathing in wine and butter and salt… inspired by that, i sauteed some spinach and tomatoes in a ton of kerrygold butter and i like to think that the yellow puddle surrounding the heap is just juice from the tomatoes - not butter, right? right…
the cauliflower fritters on top were the first of an endless batch i attempted to fry up. they mostly just fell apart but of course they TASTED delicious and that’s what really counts. it was a greasy slop of a meal.
the next day i woke up with zits covering my forehead, probably from not washing my buttery fingers very well. 

my neighbors made the most incredible sauteed swiss chard the other night. their secret was to let the chard cook for close to an hour, bathing in wine and butter and salt… inspired by that, i sauteed some spinach and tomatoes in a ton of kerrygold butter and i like to think that the yellow puddle surrounding the heap is just juice from the tomatoes - not butter, right? right…

the cauliflower fritters on top were the first of an endless batch i attempted to fry up. they mostly just fell apart but of course they TASTED delicious and that’s what really counts. it was a greasy slop of a meal.

the next day i woke up with zits covering my forehead, probably from not washing my buttery fingers very well. 

— 10 months ago with 1 note
#cauliflower  #fritter  #butter 
this gnarly looking thing is called ‘Rumbledethumps’ and i discovered it while perusing a Nigel Slater cookbook. it’s a Scottish dish and consists of heaps of butter, potato, cabbage, and onion. i think i threw some parmesan in there as well… i made it months ago and brought it over to Allison’s house. this dish is perfectly ME - ie, it’s a hodgepodge of savory, delicious, coma-inducing ingredients that can be scooped up by spoon, fork, potato chip, folded french fry, challah roll, even a piece of cheese. god bless the orkney islands! (this dish not for those with easily upset stomachs…)

this gnarly looking thing is called ‘Rumbledethumps’ and i discovered it while perusing a Nigel Slater cookbook. it’s a Scottish dish and consists of heaps of butter, potato, cabbage, and onion. i think i threw some parmesan in there as well… i made it months ago and brought it over to Allison’s house. this dish is perfectly ME - ie, it’s a hodgepodge of savory, delicious, coma-inducing ingredients that can be scooped up by spoon, fork, potato chip, folded french fry, challah roll, even a piece of cheese. god bless the orkney islands! (this dish not for those with easily upset stomachs…)

— 10 months ago with 1 note
#rumblredethump  #nigel slater 
i have a hard time cooking for myself when Dan is out of town and i’ll often rely on frozen indian from Trader Joe’s. lately i’ve been avoiding CREATING and WRITING and i’ve found that cooking - which i haven’t even really been enjoying - is a nice distraction. i used to read food blogs daily, bookmarking recipes and emailing them to friends… maybe i’m depressed. so last night i made this scramble. it’s kind of blurry and green and unappetizing but it was good, i swear. two eggs, heirloom tomatoes, spinach, avocado, garlic, and feta. i was hungry while cooking so opened up a bag of olive oil potato chips and almost finished the whole damn bag all by myself. i have no self-control around greasy potato-derived products. 
i did all of the dishes before going to bed and i felt better about that than anything else i did all day. 

i have a hard time cooking for myself when Dan is out of town and i’ll often rely on frozen indian from Trader Joe’s. lately i’ve been avoiding CREATING and WRITING and i’ve found that cooking - which i haven’t even really been enjoying - is a nice distraction. i used to read food blogs daily, bookmarking recipes and emailing them to friends… maybe i’m depressed. so last night i made this scramble. it’s kind of blurry and green and unappetizing but it was good, i swear. two eggs, heirloom tomatoes, spinach, avocado, garlic, and feta. i was hungry while cooking so opened up a bag of olive oil potato chips and almost finished the whole damn bag all by myself. i have no self-control around greasy potato-derived products. 

i did all of the dishes before going to bed and i felt better about that than anything else i did all day. 

— 10 months ago with 1 note
#scramble 
emilygould:

That’s a photo of a bottle of artisanal Brooklyn-made heirloom pepper probiotic hot sauce that was produced via a Kickstarter campaign.  I’m going to get back to it by the end of this post.
The past few weeks have been hard, also cold.  On Monday I met up with a good friend for dinner. I hadn’t seen her in a long time because she’d been in L.A.  She’s thinking of going to live there for a while. “I’ve just been feeling like everything is really hard here,” she said.  I usually try and peptalk people who say this. I’m worried about more of my friends leaving. I’m worried that if too many of them leave, I’ll have to leave too.  But that night I didn’t have the energy to deliver the peptalk.  She’s right, it is hard, stupidly hard.  It’s cold here and a lot of people are awful. Good things disappear and bad things take their place. Rich people have too much power and they abuse it. The worst men you can imagine are fucking beautiful, talented women. Young people’s idealism and energy is siphoned off vampirically by exploitative bosses.   Basic things are too expensive here, and expensive things are often offensively mediocre.  Like the dinner we were eating.  Or maybe I just wasn’t that hungry.  
I hardly need to tell you that I love food, but sometimes I lose my appetite. Sometimes it can be hard to tell whether I’ve lost interest in food because I’m sad, or whether I’m sad because I’ve lost interest in food; it becomes a vicious cycle.  At my lifetime serotonin-level nadir, January through approximately June of 2008, I lived mostly on health food store-brand frosted miniwheats and soymilk; I didn’t have the energy for anything else. I forgot why people cook or eat in restaurants.  But then at some point I made soup with my visiting brother, and later tomato salad for a barbeque.  Gradually, without really noticing it was happening, I started eating and cooking like a normal person.  After that winter was over, I never bought that brand of cereal again.
I’m not chemically depressed now, but have been sick a lot and a bit anxious.  It’s also just hard to get excited about food at this time of year: I’ve exhausted all the wintry stews and soups in my repertoire, there’s nothing in the farmer’s market but greenhouse lettuce, leggy kale, apples and roots that have already been stored a little bit too long.  Grocery shopping, usually a highlight of my week, feels more like a chore. I resent having to spend money I don’t have on food I’m not excited to cook or eat. Winter citrus is even a little bit past its prime.  It feels like time for something new to happen, but there are still months to go till spring. 
On Saturday I didn’t have enough time or inspiration to shop for a real dinner, so I did something I almost never do: bought prepared food from the counter at Greene Grape Provisions, a store I tend to avoid because a) once in the produce aisle I ran into a long-ago acquaintance, recently arrived home from her honeymoon, who’d just bought a place in the neighborhood and was curious to know whether I was “still writing” and b) it is so idiotically, offensively expensive.  I bought a $9 chicken leg and $11 worth of roasted cauliflower and fennel.  I made a mental note to bury the wrappers deep in the trash after I put the food on plates so Keith wouldn’t see them. 
The man who kickstarted this hot sauce was doing a demo in the store, singing his sauce’s artisanal sustainable probiotic praises.  And I mean, bless him, I’m sure the sauce is delicious.  But there I was, grudgingly buying one scanty dinner for money that could have provided ingredients for several meals if only I hadn’t been too lazy and disorganized and in denial about the inevitability of hunger.  And in that moment, I irrationally hated this man and his hot sauce.  I hated myself for living in a place that can be such a caricature of itself, where some people have so much and some people have so little and the rest of us pretend we have what we need, lest we allow ourselves to realize how likely it is that we’ll never get it. And I thought about the work I am doing to pay for what I’ve eaten here already.  

I love everything Emily Gould has to say.

emilygould:

That’s a photo of a bottle of artisanal Brooklyn-made heirloom pepper probiotic hot sauce that was produced via a Kickstarter campaign.  I’m going to get back to it by the end of this post.

The past few weeks have been hard, also cold.  On Monday I met up with a good friend for dinner. I hadn’t seen her in a long time because she’d been in L.A.  She’s thinking of going to live there for a while. “I’ve just been feeling like everything is really hard here,” she said.  I usually try and peptalk people who say this. I’m worried about more of my friends leaving. I’m worried that if too many of them leave, I’ll have to leave too.  But that night I didn’t have the energy to deliver the peptalk.  She’s right, it is hard, stupidly hard.  It’s cold here and a lot of people are awful. Good things disappear and bad things take their place. Rich people have too much power and they abuse it. The worst men you can imagine are fucking beautiful, talented women. Young people’s idealism and energy is siphoned off vampirically by exploitative bosses.   Basic things are too expensive here, and expensive things are often offensively mediocre.  Like the dinner we were eating.  Or maybe I just wasn’t that hungry.  

I hardly need to tell you that I love food, but sometimes I lose my appetite. Sometimes it can be hard to tell whether I’ve lost interest in food because I’m sad, or whether I’m sad because I’ve lost interest in food; it becomes a vicious cycle.  At my lifetime serotonin-level nadir, January through approximately June of 2008, I lived mostly on health food store-brand frosted miniwheats and soymilk; I didn’t have the energy for anything else. I forgot why people cook or eat in restaurants.  But then at some point I made soup with my visiting brother, and later tomato salad for a barbeque.  Gradually, without really noticing it was happening, I started eating and cooking like a normal person.  After that winter was over, I never bought that brand of cereal again.

I’m not chemically depressed now, but have been sick a lot and a bit anxious.  It’s also just hard to get excited about food at this time of year: I’ve exhausted all the wintry stews and soups in my repertoire, there’s nothing in the farmer’s market but greenhouse lettuce, leggy kale, apples and roots that have already been stored a little bit too long.  Grocery shopping, usually a highlight of my week, feels more like a chore. I resent having to spend money I don’t have on food I’m not excited to cook or eat. Winter citrus is even a little bit past its prime.  It feels like time for something new to happen, but there are still months to go till spring. 

On Saturday I didn’t have enough time or inspiration to shop for a real dinner, so I did something I almost never do: bought prepared food from the counter at Greene Grape Provisions, a store I tend to avoid because a) once in the produce aisle I ran into a long-ago acquaintance, recently arrived home from her honeymoon, who’d just bought a place in the neighborhood and was curious to know whether I was “still writing” and b) it is so idiotically, offensively expensive.  I bought a $9 chicken leg and $11 worth of roasted cauliflower and fennel.  I made a mental note to bury the wrappers deep in the trash after I put the food on plates so Keith wouldn’t see them. 

The man who kickstarted this hot sauce was doing a demo in the store, singing his sauce’s artisanal sustainable probiotic praises.  And I mean, bless him, I’m sure the sauce is delicious.  But there I was, grudgingly buying one scanty dinner for money that could have provided ingredients for several meals if only I hadn’t been too lazy and disorganized and in denial about the inevitability of hunger.  And in that moment, I irrationally hated this man and his hot sauce.  I hated myself for living in a place that can be such a caricature of itself, where some people have so much and some people have so little and the rest of us pretend we have what we need, lest we allow ourselves to realize how likely it is that we’ll never get it. And I thought about the work I am doing to pay for what I’ve eaten here already.  

I love everything Emily Gould has to say.

— 1 year ago with 206 notes
We had stir fry for breakfast on Saturday to prep us for a grueling track work out. There was a soccer game going on and Daniel and I ran circles around them - I originally wanted to do timed mile splits but felt self-conscious with all the eyes on us. It wasn’t until the end that I got the nerve to do some 100m sprints. They felt amazing. In the stir fry: brown rice, garlic, ginger, scallions, broccoli, cauliflower, egg, soy sauce and a dash of toasted sesame oil.

We had stir fry for breakfast on Saturday to prep us for a grueling track work out. There was a soccer game going on and Daniel and I ran circles around them - I originally wanted to do timed mile splits but felt self-conscious with all the eyes on us. It wasn’t until the end that I got the nerve to do some 100m sprints. They felt amazing. In the stir fry: brown rice, garlic, ginger, scallions, broccoli, cauliflower, egg, soy sauce and a dash of toasted sesame oil.

— 1 year ago
#stir fry